Smashing the fash: fascism in Australia


A student writes

Added by Anon on August 30, 2013.
Saved under Features

My formative years were spent in Mascot Public School, a typical underfunded school. It was a school that didn’t aspire to much: its motto was in plain English and hoped for the least worst of its students (“strive to achieve”); the school gates were adorned with a picture of the official mascot, a jet plane, chosen for the school’s proximity to the airport.

And, much like any underfunded school in an underfunded town in Sydney, it was a school that confronted me with ethnic diversity and tension, not unexpected in a suburb where 70% of people were born overseas, or had parents who were born overseas.

I thought of my childhood, as I’d dully gaze through the side fence of the school, waiting for a bus, of how it helped me grow and whatnot. But one morning, the school sign caught my attention instead. Someone had stickered over it with obscene messages, demanding that multiculturalism be abolished, that ‘international students’ – at a primary school – be sent back, and that students should not heed the anti-Australian lies of their teachers, designed to police the thoughts of the young. At the bottom of each sticker lay proudly: Australia First Party.

We’re told to never forget, because there is a danger in allowing the past to repeat itself. Fascism wasn’t an anomaly of world history, but is rooted in something visceral within society. It has an economic and political vision that strives to protect the legitimate members of society from the ebbs and flows of global finance and immigration; it seeks to create hope in the less fortunate by blaming society’s ills on the least fortunate. It thrives on crisis and decline, and mobilises movements by encouraging the masses to rise up against decay and attain power for the rightful heirs of the state, usually white ‘natives’.

The fringe

The leader of Australia First is Jim Saleam, who is currently running in the electorate of Cook against Scott Morrison. He was a founder of National Action in the 1980s, a far-right nationalist group that plastered racist graffiti on shop walls, intimidated multicultural groups, and produced propaganda against the ‘New World Order’; he was also convicted of his role in a shotgun attack on a member of the ANC, Nelson Mandela’s party,  and conspiring to car bomb a political opponent.

“Hi, is this, uh, Jim – James – Sa-le-am?” I stumbled over my words; embarrassingly mispronouncing a name he greeted me on the phone with (it’s “Say-lem”). It’s difficult to find the right words when the phone is picked up by one of Australia’s most notorious far-right leaders, but I manage. He speaks with a thick Australian accent, and sports a vocabulary one would expect from a PhD. His thesis, The Other Radicalism: An Inquiry Into Contemporary Australian Extreme Right Ideology, Politics And Organization 1975-1995, was supposedly written from a jail cell.

Jim Saleam refers to the aforementioned incidents as an “apocryphal history” that has now, unfortunately, become a part of the movement he is now at the forefront of. This was a concerted attack by the media, according to Saleam, with claims of Lebanese ancestry in the Sydney Morning Herald to discredit and “ethnically cleanse” him. He also claims that he was “targeted by the state” and bullied by the Special Branch of the NSW Police Force, a “notorious organisation” known for monitoring left-wing activist groups. Now disbanded for its endemic corruption, Saleam admits that the Special Branch used far-right groups to assault left-wing groups.

“Morrison is all for refugees”, he says when I ask about the election struggle in the Sutherland Shire. And Saleam? “Absolutely none.” Saleam and Australia First propose deporting refugees back to their countries of origin, assisting them with grants funded by the seizure of assets from those who aid and abet asylum seeking. Saleam denies the label of fascism, and instead identifies with “Australian nationalism.” He uses this label to defend the party’s support of an Aboriginal sovereignty as a ‘legitimate culture’ of the continent that manifests in separatism, as “they can think whatever they want of European settlement … but what’s coming is the end of Indigenous society.”

But Australia First is not the only far-right nationalist party – Pauline Hanson’s One Nation, Rise Up Australia (RUA), and the Australian Protectionist Party (APP), parties recently infamous for their deals with minor libertarian and centrist groups in this election, promote similar views. But combating immigration and multiculturalism is only the most visceral policy tying the parties together; they also agree on the nationalisation of industry, banning foreign ownership, and expanding welfare to vulnerable Australian citizens – conditional on the expulsion of undesirables.

(Israel is a point of contention – Jim Saleam and Australia First considers Zionism as a danger to Australian society through its role in the media and corporations, while the APP and RUA self-identify as Zionists who see Israel as an ally against Islam.)

Appealing to the working class is a notable function of far-right nationalist and fascist mobilising, in contrast to the libertarian right that tends to have disdain for those in poverty. This isn’t anomalous, despite their right-wing tendencies: Franco developed a national trade syndicalist organisation, and Hitler saw the role of the state in mediating class conflict, a concept absent in classical liberalism and capitalism.

Far-right groups use this populist agenda in recruiting members who do not identify with the strict nationalism of the party line. I spoke to Troy Ellis, a candidate for APP in the Western Australian electorate of Swan. Ellis was a former member of the Greens and the ALP, and a participant in Amnesty International, Greenpeace, and the Australian Conservation Fund. Confused, I asked him why he joined the APP. “They sounded like a fairer party,” noted Ellis. It was their taxation policy that drew him into the party, and he identified with the economic arguments of lowering immigration.

But he was unsure about the more extreme elements of the party. “I’m not such a hardliner on immigration myself … there might be some in APP, but I’m less of a radical myself.” The anti-Muslim stance of the party, a recent phenomenon in the far right, especially amongst RUA and One Nation, is also a topic of contention with Ellis. “The party takes a hard stance on Muslims, but I don’t mind Muslims myself.” He also spoke of his strong belief in justice for Palestinians. Ellis seemed uncomfortable with this dissonance with the party line. “But a lot of people who come here from Muslim countries are psychologically damaged.” He buttressed his sincerity in wishing to “soften the party.” Compare to co-founder Nicholas Folkes, who recently left the party and began the (more) anti-Islam Party for Freedom and believes that multiculturalism is a “failed policy” that has brought “chaos to Australia.”

Similarly, the One Nation website explicitly denounces multiculturalism and multiracialism, but has members that are unaware or uncomfortable with this policy. When asked about the political line to abolish multiracialism, Rod Evans, the national contact for One Nation, replied: “I was not aware of that … I do not adhere to that policy myself.” But, along with the rest of his party, Evans believes that Australia’s primary problem is with “the radical Muslim culture”, an issue to be resolved through a policy of “deportation.”

The far right have capitalised on the issue of Islam to build an agenda of fascist and nationalist politics. Unlike 20th century fascism, the focus of the individual is located within a civilisation as opposed to a state. While the Nazi Party promoted the Aryan Germanic race, APP, One Nation and likeminded parties speak of the threats to Western civilisation. Perhaps an intellectual response to The Clash of Civilisations thesis, or a strategic impulse to work with non-Anglo European ethnic groups against the new enemy, the far right analysis of global politics is one of conflict between Islam and the West.

Just like enemy combatants setting up camp beyond no man’s land, Melanie Vassilou believes Muslims have created “ethnic enclaves in Auburn” that “make you feel like you’re in Saudi Arabia.” She sees the face veil as a risk to society, noting “paedophiles are taking advantage of the face veil.” Running for RUA in Chisholm, Victoria, she rejects the racist label: “when you speak out on the issues, you can be perceived as racist.” She notes that their leader is Sri Lankan, and, perhaps justifying her position, Jim Saleam denounces Rise Up Australia as a multiracial party.

The mainstream

But the germination of fascism lies not only in the fringe of politics, but has roots in the centre. A passing comment by Saleam on his past struck me: “our roots were in the Australian Labor Party.” The White Australia Policy attracted the monoculturalists of nationalism movement, but beyond this, the protectionist economics and belief in industrial nationalisation appeal to some of their left-wing tendencies. National Action, after all, classified themselves as National Bolsheviks, and Australia First’s Queensland Senate candidate, Peter Watson, was a former member of the ALP and Stalinist League; Jack Lang is revered by many fascist groups in Australia; and the Victorian Socialist Party, a faction of the ALP early in the 20th century, developed a fascist tendency that dissolved into the Australia First Party.

Fascist elements also reside in the periphery of the Liberal Party in the hard right, or ‘Taliban Right’ or ‘Uglies’, faction. The roots of far right nationalism in the Liberals, that often comes into contention with the classical liberal and libertarian tendencies of the party began when the Nationalist Party merged with the United Australia Party, that soon after became the Liberal Party; likewise, the Young Nationals merged into the Young Liberals.

More uncomfortable for the party is Lyenko Urbanchich. He fled from Slovenia to Australia, having been a Nazi collaborator during the Second World War. When in Australia, he founded the Liberal Ethnic Council, using recent refugees and immigrants from the Soviet Bloc to intervene in the Liberal Party. Urbanchich was an outspoken critic of the threat of “Jewish-communism.”

The hard right is, according to some accounts, the largest faction of the NSW Liberal Party; it is the spiritual homeland of Tony Abbott; and it is the philosophical foundation of the Sydney University Conservative Club, a member of which once admitted to sympathies with fascist philosophy, in particular the belief that the poor and the rich have their ordained, natural positions in society.

The streets

Although many of the early nationalists in Australia have turned to political careers, the tendency in Europe has moved towards the opposite. Golden Dawn, for instance, organises on the street through demonstrates more than it does through parliamentary processes. The British National Party (BNP) has lost appeal in England, and the English Defence League (EDL) has grown to a threatening size. It was the EDL, after all, that Anders Breivik communicated with prior to his massacre of young social democrats in vengeance against Islamic immigration.

Unlike the BNP, which sports a comprehensive conservative agenda, the EDL is particularly opposed to Islamic immigration. Note, for instance, that the EDL has a Sikh division, as well as an LGBT division. However, organisational liberalism does not hide the fascist tendencies of the movement, but instead is a tactical endeavour to build it; Italian fascism, after all, supported expanding democracy, including the universal suffrage of women, and artistic movements such as Futurism. Progressivism in some areas veils an overall reactionary agenda.

Like the EDL, the Australian Defence League (ADL) focuses specifically on Islam. But the ADL is a grassroots movement, utilising street demonstrations and mass mobilisation to affect change. My first encounter with the ADL was on a Facebook event, when a member threatened to murder me. Although most of its demonstrations are unsuccessful, it is a growing movement, one that encourages current discourses of disintegrating borders. Searching through the closed ADL Facebook group, users complain about “muzzies”, promote gun culture against Islamic immigration, and refer to Muslims and left-wingers as “scum”.

These groups are not the main organising tools of the movement, but do provide insight into the models through which ultra-nationalism and Islamophobia develop. The ADL may ultimately not be successful, but it is a glimpse into the future of reactionary activism – on the streets, in community groups, in churches and unions, at dinner parties. Skinheads and Nazis such as the Nationalist Alternative and Southern Cross Hammerskins likewise react on the streets. The old methods of the Left have been appropriated into a movement that is reacting against the supposed failure of the political class to protect Australians.

The response

Fascism is a word prolific in dusty archives but hushed in current affairs. It is a word that is historical, that is used to define the past, but one that can never happen again. We’ve moved on: fascism is passé, thrown into the dustbin of history where it pathetically lies.

But Australia is at risk of forgetting the dangers of fascism. From experience, the term ‘fascism’ is met with mockery – it is a term people define as an extreme, and Australia is seen as a country of moderation. Popular opinion divorces fascism from an intellectual history, from its philosophy, from its economic and political strategies, and from its realness.

Although there are groups and individuals that oppose fascism in Australia, they fail to make an impression in public opinion. Anarchist blogger slackbastard follows the trends of fascism in Australia, but is a lone writer. Fight Dem Back was prolific in combating racial hatred in Australia, but is effectively defunct now. Compare this to the United Kingdom, where the National Union of Students holds a policy of ‘No Platform’, where office-bearers refuse to share a stage with members of fascist organisations; or where the Conservative, Labor, and Liberal Democrats collectively oppose the BNP, citing the legacy of Churchill who was a member of all three parties; or where the organisation Unite Against Fascism regularly demonstrates against fascist groups; as do squads of anti-fascist socialists and anarchists who clash with fascists in English communities.

One could argue that the rise of fascism is not likely in Australia. But the policies – or the trajectory of policies – of many of the groups mentioned in the article, say otherwise. While not every individual in One Nation or the Australian Protectionist Party may espouse negative attitudes towards migrants or non-white Australians, there is an organisational pressure to strengthen the state, to mobilising workers against immigrants, and to isolate Australia by solidifying its borders – and military. Authoritarianism, nationalism, and, ultimately, fascism are not ghosts of the past, but real existing tendencies in Australian politics.




(edited by MMU)

Election 2013 – guide to the freak show

From slackbastard:

Another year, another election, and once again patriots and upright-citizens-with-lower-cognitive-abilities will be appealed to by the far right, while the far left pitch their message to that dreary tribe of high-minded women and sandal-wearers and bearded fruit-juice drinkers who come flocking towards the smell of ‘progress’ like bluebottles to a dead cat.

Or something like that.


For the far right — a mixed bag including Dr James Saleam‘s Australia First Party, a handful of Protectionists, the Freedom-loving, Muslim-hating Nick Folkes, assorted miscellaneous individuals (including some number among the more mainstream Christian parties) and Others — the entry of zillionaire Clive’s ‘Palmer United Party’ and the emergence of the anti-Muslim, anti-multiculturalism Rise Up Australia will sap some energies, as will The Mad Katter in Queensland and Pauline in NSW. And of course, a commitment to Stopping the Boats & Imprisoning their Occupants unites Australia, its voters and its political parties in a way few other issues do (though there are obviously nuances in major and minor party approaches to the question).

But aside, perhaps, from One Nation, which might be more accurately described as right-wing populist, the chief player on the far right is AF. (Late last year Andrew Zammit produced ‘A tentative table on far-right radicalism’ which is especially relevant to this discussion.) AF is standing Alex Norwick in Chifley, Jim Saleam in Cook, John Carbonari in Deakin, Mick Saunders in Lindsay, Tony Pettitt in Macquarie, Michael Chehoff in Newcastle, Terry Cooksley in Port Adelaide, Lorraine Sharp in Riverina and Senate tickets in NSW and Queensland.

Finally, on a related note, the Australian Defence League — now in its third or fourth incarnation on the Internets, the self-appointed leader in this case being some bloke called Ralph Cerminara — appears to be working in close collaboration with the Wilders-inspired micro-Party for Freedom. Both parties are driven by a pathological hatred of Muslims and regularly refer to them as ‘animals’ and ‘scum’.

Ho hum.


From a senior source

And from our own senior source in the Division of Riverina comes this story on one such candidate, a serial party person by the name of Lex (Alex) Stewart.

Australia has a legacy of immigration as the primary building block of the nation, from the first arrival of convicts in chains and under punishment to the evolution of the White Australia Policy, the subsequent relaxing of that policy and the according of equal rights in the Citizens Electoral Act to all in Australia, regardless of background.

In 1788 the issue of boat people first raised its head for the original 400,000 Aboriginals and then again in 1975 with arrivals from Vietnam and China landing after long dangerous journeys to seek safe haven. Although criticised by the UN and other bodies for detaining casual arrivals, we can be proud of our acceptance of people from all walks of life, of giving them safety and of allowing ourselves to be enriched by cultures other than our own.

Griffith in particular has an amazing history of post WW1 and WW2 migration from Italy as well as China, with the mixture being added to in modern times by many other people of a variety of origins, a good thing that makes Griffith and the district prosper.

So why am I writing today? Simple, elections are upon us and we vote to exercise our power to replace governments, to install governments and to even ensure candidates who are unpalatable do not ever get near the halls of power. That last is the most powerful tool inherent in our vote, to keep the unwanted, intolerant and distasteful candidates away from our lives. We assign power to the people we want based on many factors, one of which is policy, the other personality.

The Riverina District has an opportunity to exercise that power this coming election by making sure a candidate from Clive Palmer’s populist creation, the Palmer United Party (PUP), never sets foot in parliament on our behalf.

This particular PUP candidate is like a rat jumping from ship to ship. From the Christian Democrats, he then crossed swords with the racist Australia First Party. When he was with the Citizens Electoral Party he was a Sydney candidate and a major disruption to the voters’ focus. Winds of change sent him lurching to the One Nation fiasco where as its NSW treasurer he was fully on-board with Hanson’s policies regarding immigration.

At the same time he was involved with the One Nation group, he aligned himself with the Great Australians Party, its founder John Cummings (owner of McCaffertys Coaches) said of the candidate, that he was “mentally disturbed” and “wrecked the pseudo party” at great personal and financial cost to Mr Cummings and his group in general.

The candidate has also been a Liberal organiser in West Sydney, so you begin to get a feel for his fair weather friend attitude and blatant desire to gain influence and power at any cost and with anyone who will give him a vehicle to spread his wings.

His right and far right credentials are well known. He is poison not only to his party of choice but to the electorate he purports to want to represent. I imagine with horror the reaction of our immigrant population here if they knew any of this, and I believe they do not. He has zero financial credibility and is a worry to any right thinking person if he ever had a position that allowed him access to public money. He is racist and bigoted, with a healthy dose of xenophobia thrown in for good measure.

He will speak not only with a forked tongue but will knife a person in the back if it would advance his personal agenda one iota. I implore you to join me in giving this fraud no votes whatsoever. The people of Griffith and surrounds need to know just who this person who is infiltrating events and gatherings to speak oily words of corruption into receptive ears. And the minute the many families here from overseas and with overseas parents etc. found out his true colours he would rightly become a burden to Palmer and hopefully lose the election as well as not being re-endorsed for anything political.

Riverina folk of all backgrounds have an opportunity to make sure an opportunist does not speak for them on a national stage about anything, let alone foreign or immigration policy. Our wonderful and vibrant community was built on the backs of the very people he has in the past vilified and singled out with policies and views that discriminated and marginalised these people who live among us. Use the power of your vote and keep the Riverina for the  people of the Riverina, regardless of where they originated.


More sauce

David Oldfield: born again Liberal?

“Too right wing” doesn’t seem to worry the highest ranks of the NSW Liberal Party at the moment. Less than a fortnight ago, Brogden defended the right of a former One Nation secretary, Lex Stewart, to join the Liberal Party’s Kellyglen branch in north-west Sydney.

“Everybody’s entitled to join the Liberal Party so long as they subscribe to our broad range of views,” Brogden was quoted as saying in the Sydney Morning Herald. “Not every former One Nation voter or every former One Nation member is a ridiculous extremist.”

However, the Australian Jewish News has said that Stewart was a senior One Nation official who addressed the Sydney Forum in 2003, an event organised by the extreme right wing Adelaide Institute, run by Holocaust denier Frederic Toben, who has served prison time in Germany for his views.


He [Stewart] was integral in the establishment of the Great Australians party, and was its National Leader in 2002. Just like the Citizens Electoral Council, GA calls for tax reform and economic isolationism. But just like the CEC, the party also believes in a global conspiracy involving international finance, global government and — of course — the Jews…

Lex Stewart helped establish an anti-Semitic political party, and gave a speech to a conference of racists and Holocaust-deniers,” Carr [former blogger and Labor staffer Robert Carr] concluded. “These are not matters that can be lightly brushed aside, and it is incumbent upon John Brogden to follow them up (there might be a perfectly innocent explanation) and decide whether such a person is welcome as a member of the NSW Liberal Party.”

More links
Stewart joins Palmer’s team in Riverina
‘I can unseat McCormack’

Noisy bigots drown out silent bias


April 4, 2013 – 4:04PM

Our real problem is the subterranean racism that goes largely unremarked upon and that we seem unable even to detect.

As opening lines in letters go, “I find you deeply offensive”, is pretty direct. Fair enough. I suspect lots of people do. It’s a natural consequence of media work. But then my anonymous correspondent decided to explain why: “You are foreign, you shall always be so. Piss off back to whatever Middle Eastern sinkhole you blew in here from.”

There’s nothing surprising about this. There’s nothing even particularly rare about it. Some version of that letter arrives every few months. This one was particularly unvarnished – complete with references to my wife and “half-caste kids” and cheerful threats of the return of the White Australia Policy – but the message hardly varies: this isn’t my country and my public presence is unwelcome, either because I’m a Muslim, or because in some racially determinable way not a “real” Australian. I’ve been accused of everything from taking elocution lessons to changing the spelling of my name to appear deceptively Australian before I unleash some Trojan conspiracy. Apparently, Aly is roughly equivalent to Smith. They’re onto me.

I have almost no emotional reaction to this kind of goonish racism. It’s simply too ridiculous to engage me. In fact, I’d completely forgotten about this most recent letter until racist ranting hit the headlines this week following yet another racist diatribe on a Sydney bus that was captured and posted to YouTube. It’s at least the third such case in about four months. Hence the fresh round of debate on Australian racism that always seems to follow the same unedifying pattern.

Racist rant … a screengrab of the video posted on YouTube.

First comes the shock, as though such incidents reveal something we never knew existed. Then comes the argument over whether or not Australia is a racist country. Frankly, I don’t know what the argument means. Every country has racism. How much do you need before a country itself is racist? Is it a matter of essence or degree? Do we judge it by surveying legislation, newspapers or behaviour on public transport? And even if we can answer those questions, then what?

That argument is a dead end. It’s more about a condemnatory label than the substance and nature of Australian racism. The real question is not about which adjective describes us. It’s about how best to identify and respond to the racism we inevitably harbour.

Debating the meaning of the occasional racist tirade does not help answer that. It’s just not that helpful to take extreme individual behaviour as the starting point on an issue like this. Sure, it’s troubling. Sure, it’s more common than we like to admit. Sure, it’s a problem. But it’s not the problem. The racism that really matters in Australia isn’t the high-level, weapons-grade derangement that winds its way via YouTube into the news.

Waleed Aly Photo: James Brickwood


The truth is we can’t compete with Europe for hardcore white nationalism or the US for white supremacist movements. We can’t compete with Asia or the Middle East for the maintenance of an explicit, institutionalised and sometimes codified racial hierarchy. Our racial and religious minorities are not having their communities torched (though the occasional building has been firebombed), and our handful of far-right politicians aren’t leading political parties that attract 20 per cent of the vote.

No, our real problem is the subterranean racism that goes largely unremarked upon and that we seem unable even to detect. Like the racism revealed by an Australian National University study, which found you are significantly less likely to get a job interview if you have a non-European name. The researchers sent fake CVs in response to job advertisements, changing only the name of the applicant. It turns out that if your surname is Chinese, you have to apply for 68 per cent more jobs to get the same number of interviews as an Anglo-Australian. If you are Middle Eastern, it’s 64 per cent. If you are Indigenous, 35 per cent.

This is the polite racism of the educated middle class. It’s not as shocking as the viral racist tirades we’ve seen lately. No doubt the human resources managers behind these statistics would be genuinely appalled by such acts of brazen, overt racism. Indeed, they probably enforce racial discrimination rules in their workplace and are proud to do so. Nonetheless, theirs is surely a more devastating, enduring racism. There is no event to film, just the daily, invisible operation of a silent, pervasive prejudice. It does not get called out. It’s just the way things are; a structure of society.

That is what bothers me about all the fuss that surrounds these occasional racist diatribes. It puts the focus overwhelmingly on the most exceptional kinds of racist behaviour. But are we capable of recognising racism when it isn’t gobsmackingly obvious? Recall, for example, the widespread failure to understand why former Telstra boss Sol Trujillo felt racially offended at being caricatured relentlessly as a sleepy, sombrero-wearing Mexican on a donkey, or described as a “Mexican bandit”. Certainly, criticise his management of Telstra but can we really not see the gratuitous racial stereotyping? And Trujillo is not even Mexican.

Or note the strange Australian comfort with adopting blackface. Remember when Qantas gave two Wallabies fans free tickets because they promised to dress as Radike Samo by blacking up and donning Afro wigs? No offence meant. Qantas apologised. But that’s the thing about racism: it goes beyond intentions. The most insidious kind is just so ingrained it’s involuntary. It’s not about what Qantas intended. It’s that no one responsible for the decision even saw the existence of the problem. That sort of thing worries me much more than some crude, anonymous hate mail.

It’s easy to point at the barking racists on the bus precisely because they aren’t us. They allow us to exonerate ourselves; to declare that if we have a problem with racism, at least people like us are not responsible for it. It allows us to escape self-examination of the racism we all probably harbour to some extent or other. That self-examination is crucial. Without it we have nothing to fix, and only other people to blame.

Waleed Aly presents Drive on Radio National.


More From the Protectionist Pathetics

Peter Hinds describes Australia’s skills shortage as a myth, while Darrin Hodges explains that any migration to Australia should be for non-blacks only, based on… um…

Jack Stone tries to comment on a specific event by intimating that Aboriginals in general are over-compensated, criminal scum, while Nicholas Folkes talks about his poo stains while simultaneously eluding to the fact that white people are the ‘normal’ people.

Nicholas Folkes focuses on a singular ethnic group while talking about over-population in a country that ‘struggles’ with 2.66 people per every square kilometre. Krystal Lee throws in an irrelevant comment about another country’s immigration needs while Paul Hayman strokes her ego.

No wonder this ‘political party’ can’t find a foothold in parliament. Their smartest are thicker than our society’s thickest.

Neighbours actor slams racist comments

New Neighbours stars

Menik Gooneratne, Coco-Jacinta Chen and Sachin Joab are the Kapoor family on Neighbours. (Channel 10)

09:30 Fri Dec 9 2011

The Indian actor set to become a regular cast member on Neighbours has hit back at fans of the show who criticised him, saying they probably supported the White Australia policy.

Sachin Joab, who was born in Melbourne and is of Indian descent, has been cast as the father of the Kapoor family — an attempt by Neighbours to try and represent modern Australia.

Staff at the Channel 10 show have been forced to remove angry comments from their website as people vent their anger about a non-white family becoming residents of Ramsay St.

Joab said the racism boiled down to a lack of education, the Herald Sun reports.

“There is various pockets that will say it is un-Australian to have an Indian or an Indian family on Ramsay St.

“Those Aussies who are saying it is un-Australian will be the same ones who pretty much supported the White Australia policy back in the day, you are never going to get away from that kind of stuff.”

The program’s executive producer Susan Bowers said the show had been criticised for being “too white” and it was time Neighbours represented a more modern society.

“The ABC and SBS have always done it (cast multi-cultural Australians), and it was only 20 years ago you put Greeks and Italians on TV and people would question it,” Ms Bowers told the Herald Sun.

Actors Menik Gooneratne and Coco-Jacinta Cherian will complete the Kapoor family.


Aussie Aussie Aussie! White White White!


Timothy Lindemann (on the White Australia Party public forum): “God bless this forum! WPWW (White Pride World Wide)

The ‘White Australia Party’: “Race must come first. Nation second’.

Funny that – white is a race now?

White Supremacist Argues Multiculturalism

Came across this gem of a loser. Check out his woeful rant.

‘Australians are British…so no-one with a different skin colour, apart from Aboriginals, are Australian.’

From the Australian Government citizenship website:

Australian citizenship is an important step in your migration story. Becoming an Australian citizen means that you are making an ongoing commitment to Australia and all that this country stands for. It is also the beginning of your formal membership of the Australian community. It is the step that will enable you to say ‘I am Australian’.
Australian citizenship is a privilege that offers enormous rewards. By becoming an Australian citizen, you are joining a unique national community. Our country has been built on the combined contributions of our Indigenous people and those who came later from all over the world. We celebrate this diversity and at the same time, strive for a unified and harmonious nation.
The strength of the Australian community means that we work together to solve problems and to make Australia the great country that it is. We have a stable system of government and Australians respect the authority and laws of the government. Our stability, our culture and our laws have been shaped by our history. By joining the Australian community, you will inherit this history and you will be in a position to contribute to it.
Australia was born on the backs of convict settlers from Britain, but that was over 220 years ago.

‘People simply do not have the right to come to OUR country…’

Actually, yes they do.

‘If people are paying taxes in this country and working (though they often aren’t!), then they have taken a job from an Australian… if they are raising their children here it is at the expense of Australian children…if they love ecah (sic) other, they are hating us.’

Where to start? So much ignorance.

Implying that some white Australians are only unemployed because non-white Australians are employed is possibly the most stupid thing I’ve ever heard. Imagine being granted employment not based on education or work experience, but because of your ethnicity..!

“Hi there, congratulations on being a white Australian. Here is your medical degree. Enjoy your life as a doctor.”

Part of the reason that successive governments have raised the immigration intake is to satisfy the skills shortages experienced in many facets of our economy. Ignoring people with skills and experience because of their ethnicity would be to the detriment of Australia.

Children attending schools in highly multicultural areas have exposure to a wide range of cultures and have the capacity that many adults don’t have to form cross-cultural friendships based on mutual interests and respect. Multicultural education is adopted by each state and has the full support of communities.

Suggesting that loving one’s family lessens an individual’s ability to love another is ludicrous. Love is universal and knows no bounds. Children born into loveless families are statistically inclined to perpetuate abuse onto their own future families. Alternatively, children born into tolerant, respectful loving families that teach the values treating all people with compassion are statistically socially healthy and more inclined to be motivated in education.

‘White, British, Anglo-Saxons and Celts founded and built this nation. It’s that obvious and simple. No-one else did.’

Perhaps many of the customs and traditions that we see in society today have strong British influences, but that is where it ends. Australia was built on the backs of migrants as well as white European settlers. The Gold Rushes and The Snowy Mountains Scheme are two examples.

‘Stating how “multi-cultural” Melbourne and Sydney are now only proves how wrong things are.’

Subjectivity is never a strong point in debate, Scott.

Nobody is asking anyone to leave their cities. There will be no defeat, there will be no uprising. There will be no retreat. These are all narrow-minded ramblings from an insecure bogan. We are being asked to share what we have with people from other countries, and to do that does not suggest that we need to lose any of what we have. We still have our pristine beaches, our freedom of democracy and speech, our entertainment and sporting influences, our BBQs and bikinis, our beer and State of Origin. We still have the right to choose our child’s education and we still have the right to practice our own religion. We have access to financial assistance and access to healthcare. We still have the right to come and go as we please and we have the right to love whoever we want. Where have our freedoms been eroded? When has our way of life been attacked?

You’re a racist scumbag, Scott. You are truly a dense bogan and the irony is that your ‘friends’ list consists of nothing but Asian models you will never have the luxury of being with.

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