Rape Culture Seeps Into Spectrum’s Cocktail Menu

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As you may have noticed above, Spectrum Daiquiri Bar in Brisbane has a couple of drinks on its menu that are clearly offensive, particularly to women. Calling a drink a ‘slut’ because it ‘goes down well’, or a ‘winey [sic] bitch’ because it ‘shuts her up’ in the company of the combination of men and alcohol is a big deal and we’ll come to that later. Spectrum clearly made a social media error by asking people for feedback for 2013 planning as literally hundreds of men and women turned up to their Facebook page telling them that such drink names were offensive. But what’s possibly more disturbing than the names of the drinks is the reaction of Spectrum management and a select bunch of anti-‘feminazi’ barflies. The very fact that the bar asked for feedback and proceeded to delete tens of rational and respectful comments and requests while leaving plenty of insulting comments from their lowlife regulars also speaks volumes.

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Leonard Walker thinks that those who speak up against pejorative, gender-specific derogatory slurs are automatically ‘…screeching unwashed armpiitted [sic] ones.” He sees those who find such slurs as offensive as “…faux intellectuals…” who are not only screeching but also crying and whining. Misogyny much? In his pithy paragraph he highlights exactly how he views women who speak out against degradation and also shows that he is completely unable to identify degradation when it’s happening right in front of him. It should be noted that one of the four people who ‘liked’ Leonard’s comments was the bar manager.

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John Thompson is under the misguided impression that making a comment on a Facebook page is a completely time consuming activity for people who believe in opposing sexism. The assumption that anti-bigots have ‘targets of the day’ is actually somewhat of a faux pas because it suggests that there are proponents of sexism to be found everywhere, and each day there is someone new dishing out the misogynistic cocktail. I wonder if that was his intent.

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Josh L M Brewer makes the mistake of believing that the only people who could possibly find offence with these publicity-in-a-glass stunt-drinks are ’40 something feminists’. He also makes the mistake that the same people are primarily and only occupied with getting ‘knickers in a knot’ over cocktail names and nothing else.

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Greg made a total of eight (8) spelling and grammar errors in one sentence. Enough said about this oxygen thief.

There are more highlights from the Facebook thread attached below. What we are seeing at play here is this ‘new concept’ of ‘rape culture’. If you look at any media source today, with your eyes open, you may begin to notice that women are portrayed in a completely different way to men. Women make up only 24% of news subjects (the people in the news), and appear in newspapers and magazines in far more common states of undress. Women rarely save the day in movies and television and when they are playing the heroic protagonist, they are nothing short of a fighting fuck toy (Lara Croft, Invisible Girl [Fantastic Four], Catwoman etc.). Women appear in advertising as either sexual playthings or household props and when only 2.4% of CEOs and management positions are filled by women in a country like Australia, you can start to see why people start to get their backs up when remarks like ‘whiney bitch’ and ‘slut’ are considered ‘tongue in cheek’ and part of the common vernacular.

So why does any of this matter? Why should we give two craps if some shitty dive in Brisvegas has a couple of offensive drink titles on its largely uninspiring and unoriginal cocktail menu?

1. The words ‘bitch’ and ‘slut’ are as offensive to women as the words ‘nigger’, ‘chink’, ‘dune coon’ and ‘kike’. They represent oppression, denigration and slander. When such words become commonly accepted, the negative connotations stick. Black African Americans are in the process of ‘taking back’ the word ‘nigger’ in attempts to reverse the negativity in the same way that Italians, Greeks and people from the Mediterranean are trying to nullify the effects of the word ‘wog’. It could be argued that some women are attempting to do the same with the word ‘bitch’ by proclaiming a pride in being outspoken and the organisers of the Slutwalk (a mass protest where women dressed scantily in response to police suggesting that they were less likely to be raped if they covered up) were also trying to spin a positive angle to the word ‘slut’. But naming a drink ‘bitch’ (and adding that it will shut up her ‘whining’) and ‘slut’ (because the alcohol will make her go down on you) is completely inappropriate.

2. The definition of the word ‘slut’ is basically a slovenly or promiscuous woman. If you applied that definition to a man, society would brand him a cheeky playboy and in some men’s circles a hero. But apparently it’s wrong for a female to enjoy sex or to seek multiple partners. The problem with this is that choosing one’s partners grants you power and that goes against what society deems to be appropriate for women. If a woman is ever referred to as a slut, you can rest assured that 9 times out of 10 it’s being used against her in a pejorative sense.

3. Men who are outspoken are brave and inspirational. They are confident and passionate. Women who speak up are whiney, shrieking, screeching banshees. Men who speak their mind wear their hearts on their sleeves but women who speak their mind are seen as bitches. Again, if you’re ever called a bitch, you can assume you’re not being complimented.

4. Alcohol plays a significant role in the rape scene. In various studies it has been shown that between 20-25% of rape perpetrators and rape victims have been found to be heavily intoxicated, and another between 20-25% of rape perpetrators and victims as mildly under the influence of alcohol. Let’s be clear about this: a woman under the influence of alcohol cannot consent to sex. Of course, many drunk people have sex but that doesn’t suggest that a person is able to make clear, conscious decisions about intercourse – it just means drunk sex is just a fact of life and something that will always happen. Laughing at the bar about getting someone drunk enough to root is entirely unacceptable.

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Here’s a few of our previously featured rape supporters:

“I would so rape her” says Aussie Hip Hop Hopeful

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“I would so rape her.”

                                                  – Cino Rizo Lane

                                                                   (father of two children)

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(Previous place of work above, current place of work below:)

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True Courage

Republished and edited from mindmadeup blog


People gather at Delhi’s Mahatma Gandhi memorial to honour the 23-year-old rape victim. Photograph: Anindito Mukherjee/EPA

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The Indian Bar Association last week decided against defending the six suspects because of the nature of the crime, although the court is expected to appoint lawyers to defend them.

Indian media have reported that forensic evidence indicates the victim of the attack, who died on Saturday at a hospital in Singapore, struggled violently, repeatedly biting her assailants.

sexualassaulttips

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Elsewhere
We must face up to our own rape culture

Cody Weiland and his rape fantasies

“Men call me things”

Campaign to fight misogyny ‘flawed’
Michelle Griffin
November 9, 2011 The Age

A TWITTER campaign to highlight anonymous abuse could do more harm than good, warns Australian cyber safety expert Susan McLean.

Using the hashtag #mencallmethings, women in Australia, Britain and the US have started reposting violent and defamatory comments made about them online. The aim is to raise awareness of the viciousness of online misogyny, but Ms Mclean fears the campaign will only encourage abuse.

”It will only inflame the situation,” said Ms McLean, a former police officer who has been working on cyber bullying cases since 1994. Women who receive anonymous threats of rape or assault should go to the police and campaign to get the cases prosecuted, she said, noting the speed with which police tracked down alleged ”collar-bomber” Paul Peters from an anonymous Gmail account.

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Now hang on Susan. There’s a distinct flavour of “cop-speak”  in your statement.

Clive Pugh

Cop-speak...shifting the blame... in a northerly direction

It’s the misogynist men who make the comments in the first place. They have inflamed the situation, not the women who are fighting back.

Secondly, the “collar-bomb” incident was a critical major hostage incident which was appropriately and successfully dealt with by following correct police procedure. It has nothing to do with sexism or misogyny – the victim could just as well have been a young man or another family member.

It was not in the same crime category as the insidious and ongoing hatred shown by misogynist comments on social media.

Susan McLean’s reaction sounds too much like some of the official reaction to the Slutwalk protesters, as well as reminding us of the comments made by senior Victoria Police when Indian students were being attacked. In other words

…it’s the victim’s fault shhhh…

Sometimes the police will say go away, there’s nothing they could do. They try and fob off people … but it will embarrass police forces around Australia if they were bombarded with these complaints and then they failed to act.”

Susan, police often fail to act . Social media like Facebook and Twitter are often indifferent.

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The #mencallmethings campaign was launched on Monday by US blogger Sady Doyle.

”People don’t often talk about it, because that’s seen as complaining or whining,” Ms Doyle told The Age.

The campaign does not target the internet trolls who provoke arguments, Ms Doyle said. It’s about exposing personal hatred aimed at women online. ”These people aren’t just saying they hate women in order to get a reaction; they mean it.”

Many columnists, including anti-porn campaigner Melinda Tankard Reist, Princesses and Pornstars author Emily Maguire and Melbourne SlutWalk founder Clementine Bastow, welcomed the campaign.

”I’m absolutely sick and tired of individual creeps telling us they’re going to rape us or kill us,” said social commentator Nina Funnell. ”For so long, we’ve been told to lighten up … But these comments are reflective of a deep misogyny.

”When you get anonymous attacks, you don’t know who those people are … it can lead to paranoia. You have no idea of your level of safety.”

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Women could send screen grabs of misogynist abuse to anti-discrimination site The Anti Bogan, a spokesman for the site said. ”Censorship gets nowhere, but by naming and shaming, we can give these people the publicity they deserve.” The site has exposed Australians by name for racist comments on websites and Facebook.

Please do so

theantibogan@gmail.com

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You can deal with abuse when you know the source, says parenting expert Dannielle Miller, who received an apology after the Facebook page of Australian kickboxing champion John Wayne Parr featured the comment: ”If there was ever a question some females should be punched in the face … ” alongside photos of Ms Miller, Kerri-Anne Kennerley and News Ltd columnist Angela Mollard.

Ms Miller didn’t fear Mr Parr, but she worried that the kickboxer’s fans might take him literally. ”My family were very worried and telling me I had to be careful.”

misogyny

Elsewhere Troll attack campaign goes viral

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