“No wonder so many people think we are all stupid, bigotted racist red necks!” (sic)

Anyone who has come across a gathering of bogots on the internet has experienced the depths of Bogotariat indignation when someone suggests that their anti-Muslim rants might be an indication of, well, very poorly veiled racism.

Mostly because they are.

Very occasionally – very, very occasionally – a tiny spark goes off in the bogot brain and looks like it might actually fire up the engine room for some critical thought.

In one such instance, one enterprising boguette has decided to open a new anti-halal group where she, as the group admin, intends to weed any racist comments out of the discussion so that the message will be taken seriously.  Particularly by friends and family who, thus far, may have her pegged as being racist.

And maybe, just maybe, this is the start of some kind of revelation or epiphany?.  Maybe there is hope that some of the bogot elements might finally be realising that racism is ugly and unacceptable?  That it is a sentiment and a thought process that they need to reject?

Maybe, just maybe, they’re getting somewhere?

 

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Sigh.

 

It seems not.  They still want to be racist, they just think they can hide it by not being explicit about it, and no one will notice.

Yeah.  Right.

Nevertheless, the very notion appears to just wind one of the other boguettes up like too many cans of Monster before a big night out at Penrith Panthers (if you haven’t heard of it, it’s a world of entertainment).

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Indeed.

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Hahahahahahaha.

Sorry, didn’t meant to interrupt.  Let me just take a few steps back and let them sort it out like… adults?

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No wonder!

 

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And so it was.  (Removed.)

The Bogotariat just aren’t ready for crazy new ideas like trying to better hide their racism so they can pretend to be arguing from a rational perspective.

It’s just TOO MUCH TO ASK, GUYS.  OKAY?

“End of Story”!

Liz Geyer: “We are the true ANZAC’s (sic), not them.”

 

Liz Geyer is a very proud Strayan, with some very probing questions.

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Okay.  Let’s start at the beginning.

“This one is for my fellow ANZAC’s. (sic)

You’re not an ANZAC and nor is anyone else on Facebook.  The last ANZAC passed away over a decade ago.

“How many Muslims have you seen singing our National Anthems?”

National anthems?  Plural?

If you mean ‘Advance Australia Fair’, here’s one example.

For the most part, though, how do you tell?  Perhaps you can get a crowd shot from a major sporting match where the anthem is played, and go through it and tell us which people in the crowd are Muslim and which are non-Muslim.  And explain how you can discern this based on just looking at someone.  Please.

“How many Muslims have you seen waving our flags or having our national icons painted on their faces?”

This kind of thing, you mean?

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“How many Muslims have you seen attending ANZAC Day?”

How would you know what religion the people in the crowd were?  Or, for that matter, in the parade itself?

In July 2013 there were 88 Muslims serving in the ADF, so it stands to reason that some of them might well have marched in the parade on ANZAC Day in the past, and may do so again this year.

“How many Muslims have you seen wearing a Poppy to commemorate the fallen?”

Quite a few, actually. 

There are probably many who don’t, as well.  Along with many non-Muslims who don’t.

“How many Muslims have you seen donating money or food to national emergencies or charities?”

Do you mean like when the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, part of the United Arab Emirates, donated $30 million to the state of Queensland to build cyclone shelters, such as this one at a high school in Yeppoon?

Or when the Muslim Charitable Foundation (MCF) donated pallets of gyprock to repair 50-60 flood damaged homes in Ipswich and, together with the Queensland Muslim Welfare Association, delivered two truckloads of clothing and linen to flood victims?

Perhaps when Islamic Relief collected sleeping bags for those who had lost their homes in bushfires, or when Lakemba Mosque raised $26,000 in a single Friday night for Brisbane flood victims?

Like that, Liz?

“If you answered none to all of those then you are correct.”

Well this is awkward.  Let’s see if we can provide a quick correction:

If you answered none to all of those then you are correct an ignoramus.

“They claim to be citizens like us, some were even born here, but, they demand more rights than us, more freedom than us, more allowance than us, more, more, more, more.”

Uh, no.

“If we are all citizens as they claim, then why should they demand more, what right do they have to do so?”

Citation needed.

“The difference is, they can act like us, but we ARE us.”

Er… what?

“We are the true ANZAC’s (sic), not them. No Islamist will be an ANZAC citizen.
Not then, not now, not EVER!”

A citizen of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps of WWI?  lolwhut?

Liz, you are not an ANZAC.  You’re just someone typing away on Facebook, trying to assume the voice of long dead soldiers to push your own views, which is pretty disgusting.  You don’t speak for dead soldiers.

Seeing as you present yourself as such a parochial halfwit proud Australian citizen you should probably invest some time in actually understanding the military history of the country you claim to defend and the terms that relate to that history.

 

 

 

 

 

All frocked up in Fortress Straya

Just when and where you least expect it – a military strategist on Facebook.

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But there’s more

Err….isn’t that the Army contingent marching at this year’s Mardi Gras? We thought the far right didn’t approve of such things.

After all the Mardi Gras is about equality, tolerance, acceptance, celebrating one’s sexuality and having fun.

Makes a nice change from the far right which is all about homophobia, racial and religious intolerance and lots of threats of violence.

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But check out Andrew’s profile pic. Certainly a nice bit of clobber for the Mardi Gras. Figure-hugging cloth of gold always goes down well – not to mention the well-muscled winged chap in the background – the one with the enormous horn.

And we really like these strategic troop movements too

Sergio’s Little Shop of Horrors

#auspol        #@ndy Fleming     #crikey_news

Sergio Redegalli has had a rough time of it since coming out of the closet as a proud anti-Muslim.

We have watched Sergio’s career with great hilarity interest since we discovered that on his rapid downward trajectory from being a respected glass artist to the company of the odorous underbelly of Australian politics he has apparently at times disguised himself as a woman and infiltrated public toilets all over the place.

Firstly the crude anti-burqa mural slapped by him on the wall of his studio in Newtown has been vandalised many times, the latest occurrence being on the evening of 24th January this year.

Secondly despite the arcane powers vested in his wall art, he was unable to scratch up more than 87 votes in the 2012 NSW Local Government elections, despite even standing in a group with apparently non-Fascist independents, cafe owner George Reiterbauer and grumpy resident activist Chelsea Kovic.

Group E: Independents 440 votes 4.39%
REDEGALLI Sergio: 87 votes 0.87%
REITERBAUER George: 22 votes 0.22%
KOVIC Chelsea: 21 votes 0.21%
Group Total: 570 votes 5.69%

But perhaps the most puzzling incident happened on the 10th February and was lovingly reported by “Sheik Yermami” AKA Werner Reimann on his Farts of Jihad bloglet (we won’t link to it)

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OK so here’s Sergio in the lobby of Newtown Police Station with blood from an obvious head injury with photographs kindly provided by someone.

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Nasty stuff.

And unlike the enemy, who stalk, harass, threaten and intimidate, TAB deplores violence, even against the enemy.

However, when one reads the allegations and looks at the injury one starts to wonder.

The allegation is that “unknown assailants in a moving car” threw a bottle at the victim, thus causing the head wound.

The chances that an unbroken bottle hurled from a moving car can cause a laceration deep enough to bleed that copiously (and yes we know head wounds do bleed copiously) are somewhat low. Experts we consulted tell us it looks like an injury delivered at close quarters.

This did not phase Team Sergio who went on to post their reactions. Ralph Cerminara, who is distinctly out of favour at the moment with the collection of street thugs he formerly led ADL, was one of the first, promising the group which has just booted him out would be there to deliver some unspecified help, probably involving a lot of shouty posts on Facebook.

All were mainly promoting the notion of the blow having been delivered by those damn Muslamic rayguns, egged on by traitorous multicultural magistrates – a notion which will go down really well at the local court.

And then there was the last comment which allowed its anti-Semitism to briefly emerge before tucking it back in its pants.

Tsk.

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We hope Sergio has recovered. We enjoy laughing at him and his misguided mates.

PS: When the alleged bottle chucker emerges from gaol the Australian cricket team want to talk to him.

Election special No 15 – Holz claims growing support for plan to ban burqa

We wonder how many Muslims are living in the Division of Paterson. Thousands? Millions?

According to the 2001 ABS figures updated in 2003, the number of Muslims in the Hunter region which roughly corresponds to the Division of Paterson is 985. Let’s assume around half are women. Most of those women live in metropolitan Newcastle/Lake Macquarie. Only a small part of metropolitan Newcastle is in Paterson.

Assuming that based on a proportion of figures for areas of Sydney with a high Muslim population maybe half a dozen of those wear face covering (not “burqas”) we are talking about SIX WOMEN.

Assuming that these women probably live in Newcastle rather than in the rural and coastal areas which make up Paterson we are looking at NO WOMEN.

So old Bob is fired up against something which does not exist. Then again he is a believer…

Smashing the fash: fascism in Australia

 

A student writes

Added by Anon on August 30, 2013.
Saved under Features

My formative years were spent in Mascot Public School, a typical underfunded school. It was a school that didn’t aspire to much: its motto was in plain English and hoped for the least worst of its students (“strive to achieve”); the school gates were adorned with a picture of the official mascot, a jet plane, chosen for the school’s proximity to the airport.

And, much like any underfunded school in an underfunded town in Sydney, it was a school that confronted me with ethnic diversity and tension, not unexpected in a suburb where 70% of people were born overseas, or had parents who were born overseas.

I thought of my childhood, as I’d dully gaze through the side fence of the school, waiting for a bus, of how it helped me grow and whatnot. But one morning, the school sign caught my attention instead. Someone had stickered over it with obscene messages, demanding that multiculturalism be abolished, that ‘international students’ – at a primary school – be sent back, and that students should not heed the anti-Australian lies of their teachers, designed to police the thoughts of the young. At the bottom of each sticker lay proudly: Australia First Party.

We’re told to never forget, because there is a danger in allowing the past to repeat itself. Fascism wasn’t an anomaly of world history, but is rooted in something visceral within society. It has an economic and political vision that strives to protect the legitimate members of society from the ebbs and flows of global finance and immigration; it seeks to create hope in the less fortunate by blaming society’s ills on the least fortunate. It thrives on crisis and decline, and mobilises movements by encouraging the masses to rise up against decay and attain power for the rightful heirs of the state, usually white ‘natives’.

The fringe

The leader of Australia First is Jim Saleam, who is currently running in the electorate of Cook against Scott Morrison. He was a founder of National Action in the 1980s, a far-right nationalist group that plastered racist graffiti on shop walls, intimidated multicultural groups, and produced propaganda against the ‘New World Order’; he was also convicted of his role in a shotgun attack on a member of the ANC, Nelson Mandela’s party,  and conspiring to car bomb a political opponent.

“Hi, is this, uh, Jim – James – Sa-le-am?” I stumbled over my words; embarrassingly mispronouncing a name he greeted me on the phone with (it’s “Say-lem”). It’s difficult to find the right words when the phone is picked up by one of Australia’s most notorious far-right leaders, but I manage. He speaks with a thick Australian accent, and sports a vocabulary one would expect from a PhD. His thesis, The Other Radicalism: An Inquiry Into Contemporary Australian Extreme Right Ideology, Politics And Organization 1975-1995, was supposedly written from a jail cell.

Jim Saleam refers to the aforementioned incidents as an “apocryphal history” that has now, unfortunately, become a part of the movement he is now at the forefront of. This was a concerted attack by the media, according to Saleam, with claims of Lebanese ancestry in the Sydney Morning Herald to discredit and “ethnically cleanse” him. He also claims that he was “targeted by the state” and bullied by the Special Branch of the NSW Police Force, a “notorious organisation” known for monitoring left-wing activist groups. Now disbanded for its endemic corruption, Saleam admits that the Special Branch used far-right groups to assault left-wing groups.

“Morrison is all for refugees”, he says when I ask about the election struggle in the Sutherland Shire. And Saleam? “Absolutely none.” Saleam and Australia First propose deporting refugees back to their countries of origin, assisting them with grants funded by the seizure of assets from those who aid and abet asylum seeking. Saleam denies the label of fascism, and instead identifies with “Australian nationalism.” He uses this label to defend the party’s support of an Aboriginal sovereignty as a ‘legitimate culture’ of the continent that manifests in separatism, as “they can think whatever they want of European settlement … but what’s coming is the end of Indigenous society.”

But Australia First is not the only far-right nationalist party – Pauline Hanson’s One Nation, Rise Up Australia (RUA), and the Australian Protectionist Party (APP), parties recently infamous for their deals with minor libertarian and centrist groups in this election, promote similar views. But combating immigration and multiculturalism is only the most visceral policy tying the parties together; they also agree on the nationalisation of industry, banning foreign ownership, and expanding welfare to vulnerable Australian citizens – conditional on the expulsion of undesirables.

(Israel is a point of contention – Jim Saleam and Australia First considers Zionism as a danger to Australian society through its role in the media and corporations, while the APP and RUA self-identify as Zionists who see Israel as an ally against Islam.)

Appealing to the working class is a notable function of far-right nationalist and fascist mobilising, in contrast to the libertarian right that tends to have disdain for those in poverty. This isn’t anomalous, despite their right-wing tendencies: Franco developed a national trade syndicalist organisation, and Hitler saw the role of the state in mediating class conflict, a concept absent in classical liberalism and capitalism.

Far-right groups use this populist agenda in recruiting members who do not identify with the strict nationalism of the party line. I spoke to Troy Ellis, a candidate for APP in the Western Australian electorate of Swan. Ellis was a former member of the Greens and the ALP, and a participant in Amnesty International, Greenpeace, and the Australian Conservation Fund. Confused, I asked him why he joined the APP. “They sounded like a fairer party,” noted Ellis. It was their taxation policy that drew him into the party, and he identified with the economic arguments of lowering immigration.

But he was unsure about the more extreme elements of the party. “I’m not such a hardliner on immigration myself … there might be some in APP, but I’m less of a radical myself.” The anti-Muslim stance of the party, a recent phenomenon in the far right, especially amongst RUA and One Nation, is also a topic of contention with Ellis. “The party takes a hard stance on Muslims, but I don’t mind Muslims myself.” He also spoke of his strong belief in justice for Palestinians. Ellis seemed uncomfortable with this dissonance with the party line. “But a lot of people who come here from Muslim countries are psychologically damaged.” He buttressed his sincerity in wishing to “soften the party.” Compare to co-founder Nicholas Folkes, who recently left the party and began the (more) anti-Islam Party for Freedom and believes that multiculturalism is a “failed policy” that has brought “chaos to Australia.”

Similarly, the One Nation website explicitly denounces multiculturalism and multiracialism, but has members that are unaware or uncomfortable with this policy. When asked about the political line to abolish multiracialism, Rod Evans, the national contact for One Nation, replied: “I was not aware of that … I do not adhere to that policy myself.” But, along with the rest of his party, Evans believes that Australia’s primary problem is with “the radical Muslim culture”, an issue to be resolved through a policy of “deportation.”

The far right have capitalised on the issue of Islam to build an agenda of fascist and nationalist politics. Unlike 20th century fascism, the focus of the individual is located within a civilisation as opposed to a state. While the Nazi Party promoted the Aryan Germanic race, APP, One Nation and likeminded parties speak of the threats to Western civilisation. Perhaps an intellectual response to The Clash of Civilisations thesis, or a strategic impulse to work with non-Anglo European ethnic groups against the new enemy, the far right analysis of global politics is one of conflict between Islam and the West.

Just like enemy combatants setting up camp beyond no man’s land, Melanie Vassilou believes Muslims have created “ethnic enclaves in Auburn” that “make you feel like you’re in Saudi Arabia.” She sees the face veil as a risk to society, noting “paedophiles are taking advantage of the face veil.” Running for RUA in Chisholm, Victoria, she rejects the racist label: “when you speak out on the issues, you can be perceived as racist.” She notes that their leader is Sri Lankan, and, perhaps justifying her position, Jim Saleam denounces Rise Up Australia as a multiracial party.

The mainstream

But the germination of fascism lies not only in the fringe of politics, but has roots in the centre. A passing comment by Saleam on his past struck me: “our roots were in the Australian Labor Party.” The White Australia Policy attracted the monoculturalists of nationalism movement, but beyond this, the protectionist economics and belief in industrial nationalisation appeal to some of their left-wing tendencies. National Action, after all, classified themselves as National Bolsheviks, and Australia First’s Queensland Senate candidate, Peter Watson, was a former member of the ALP and Stalinist League; Jack Lang is revered by many fascist groups in Australia; and the Victorian Socialist Party, a faction of the ALP early in the 20th century, developed a fascist tendency that dissolved into the Australia First Party.

Fascist elements also reside in the periphery of the Liberal Party in the hard right, or ‘Taliban Right’ or ‘Uglies’, faction. The roots of far right nationalism in the Liberals, that often comes into contention with the classical liberal and libertarian tendencies of the party began when the Nationalist Party merged with the United Australia Party, that soon after became the Liberal Party; likewise, the Young Nationals merged into the Young Liberals.

More uncomfortable for the party is Lyenko Urbanchich. He fled from Slovenia to Australia, having been a Nazi collaborator during the Second World War. When in Australia, he founded the Liberal Ethnic Council, using recent refugees and immigrants from the Soviet Bloc to intervene in the Liberal Party. Urbanchich was an outspoken critic of the threat of “Jewish-communism.”

The hard right is, according to some accounts, the largest faction of the NSW Liberal Party; it is the spiritual homeland of Tony Abbott; and it is the philosophical foundation of the Sydney University Conservative Club, a member of which once admitted to sympathies with fascist philosophy, in particular the belief that the poor and the rich have their ordained, natural positions in society.

The streets

Although many of the early nationalists in Australia have turned to political careers, the tendency in Europe has moved towards the opposite. Golden Dawn, for instance, organises on the street through demonstrates more than it does through parliamentary processes. The British National Party (BNP) has lost appeal in England, and the English Defence League (EDL) has grown to a threatening size. It was the EDL, after all, that Anders Breivik communicated with prior to his massacre of young social democrats in vengeance against Islamic immigration.

Unlike the BNP, which sports a comprehensive conservative agenda, the EDL is particularly opposed to Islamic immigration. Note, for instance, that the EDL has a Sikh division, as well as an LGBT division. However, organisational liberalism does not hide the fascist tendencies of the movement, but instead is a tactical endeavour to build it; Italian fascism, after all, supported expanding democracy, including the universal suffrage of women, and artistic movements such as Futurism. Progressivism in some areas veils an overall reactionary agenda.

Like the EDL, the Australian Defence League (ADL) focuses specifically on Islam. But the ADL is a grassroots movement, utilising street demonstrations and mass mobilisation to affect change. My first encounter with the ADL was on a Facebook event, when a member threatened to murder me. Although most of its demonstrations are unsuccessful, it is a growing movement, one that encourages current discourses of disintegrating borders. Searching through the closed ADL Facebook group, users complain about “muzzies”, promote gun culture against Islamic immigration, and refer to Muslims and left-wingers as “scum”.

These groups are not the main organising tools of the movement, but do provide insight into the models through which ultra-nationalism and Islamophobia develop. The ADL may ultimately not be successful, but it is a glimpse into the future of reactionary activism – on the streets, in community groups, in churches and unions, at dinner parties. Skinheads and Nazis such as the Nationalist Alternative and Southern Cross Hammerskins likewise react on the streets. The old methods of the Left have been appropriated into a movement that is reacting against the supposed failure of the political class to protect Australians.

The response

Fascism is a word prolific in dusty archives but hushed in current affairs. It is a word that is historical, that is used to define the past, but one that can never happen again. We’ve moved on: fascism is passé, thrown into the dustbin of history where it pathetically lies.

But Australia is at risk of forgetting the dangers of fascism. From experience, the term ‘fascism’ is met with mockery – it is a term people define as an extreme, and Australia is seen as a country of moderation. Popular opinion divorces fascism from an intellectual history, from its philosophy, from its economic and political strategies, and from its realness.

Although there are groups and individuals that oppose fascism in Australia, they fail to make an impression in public opinion. Anarchist blogger slackbastard follows the trends of fascism in Australia, but is a lone writer. Fight Dem Back was prolific in combating racial hatred in Australia, but is effectively defunct now. Compare this to the United Kingdom, where the National Union of Students holds a policy of ‘No Platform’, where office-bearers refuse to share a stage with members of fascist organisations; or where the Conservative, Labor, and Liberal Democrats collectively oppose the BNP, citing the legacy of Churchill who was a member of all three parties; or where the organisation Unite Against Fascism regularly demonstrates against fascist groups; as do squads of anti-fascist socialists and anarchists who clash with fascists in English communities.

One could argue that the rise of fascism is not likely in Australia. But the policies – or the trajectory of policies – of many of the groups mentioned in the article, say otherwise. While not every individual in One Nation or the Australian Protectionist Party may espouse negative attitudes towards migrants or non-white Australians, there is an organisational pressure to strengthen the state, to mobilising workers against immigrants, and to isolate Australia by solidifying its borders – and military. Authoritarianism, nationalism, and, ultimately, fascism are not ghosts of the past, but real existing tendencies in Australian politics.

 

 

Source

(edited by MMU)

The Hoopla: US & THEM PROJECT

By Randa Abdel-Fattah
July 3, 2013

Anglo-Australians are a bunch of drunken bogans. They wear wife-beater Bonds singlets, drive around in utes with bumper stickers such as ‘Real Aussies drive utes’ or ‘F off, we’re full’.

When they’re not marinating their barbecue meat in VB, they’re at the pokies or bumming around at the beach, or posing for a photo in front of a Holden while draped in an Aussie flag, posting status updates about Aussie pride.

Pretty offensive, isn’t it? This kind of crude caricature is intuitively repulsive.

Imagine what it would be like if every news story about Anglo Australians contained an accompanying image of a drunkard in a ute. Actually, no, I think I can do better than that. An image of a cast member from The Shire.

Imagine if every racist, sexist, rat bag named and shamed on the online site, the anti-bogan press, was the visual representation and dominant marker of Anglo Australian identity.

Now imagine you are a Muslim and belong to any one of the countless ethnic backgrounds that characterise the Australian Muslim community. Or imagine you are an Arab. The most persistent images of Islam and Muslims that we are bombarded with in our popular culture and media are the Shire equivalents in Muslim communities.

If you don’t believe me, just switch to Today Tonight, which regularly churns out the ‘angry bearded Muslim man’ story.

All the research demonstrates that since the 1990s and certainly post-September 11, Muslims and Arabs are our ‘folk devils’. The vitriol and Islamophobic diatribe Ed Husic (Australia’s first federal parliamentarian of Muslim background) was subjected to yesterday for choosing to swear an oath on the Koran was not surprising.

Being Australian and Muslim is considered an oxymoron.

Muslims are accused of failing to ‘fit in’ (code for abandoning one’s Muslim identity) or, as part of larger moral panics and discourses surrounding Islam, are viewed as a clandestine group attempting to subvert the nation from within.

When you type a text in your smart phone, the predictor text function automatically inserts a word that overrides what you intended to write. I believe that even the most well-meaning ‘I’m-not-racist-but types’ have failed to develop an immunity to the predictor text function.

Because we are living in a time when any and all discussions about Muslims and Arabs start from several default positions, namely, that a) Islam is intrinsically incompatible with Western values; b) Muslims and terrorism are inextricably linked and c) Islam oppresses women.

And so in the public imagination you try to say ‘Muslim’ but what you automatically get is ‘terrorist’, ‘extremist’, ‘radical’, ‘fundamentalist’, ‘Islamist’. You say Muslim woman and you get a woman in a black burqa. You say Muslim man and you get an angry, hairy bearded guy frothing at the mouth.

But wait! We should reassure ourselves, we are told ad nauseam, because the Italians, Greeks and Asians had their turn. Is that supposed to make us feel better about our experience of prejudice? We just need to wait until we can hand the baton onto another group and breathe a sigh of relief that the focus is off us.

The only thing that Australia’s ‘cycle’ of victims tells us is that Australia is fundamentally a racist country.

One of the most insidious aspects of the racism we see in Australia is how deeply entrenched it is in the language we use in our public space and discourse, and how such language threatens the capacity for Muslims as a diverse and nuanced group to be treated as legitimate citizens.

By language I mean words and representations and the values and meanings we ascribe to particular communities. I mean the way we visualise Muslim otherness.

Countless studies have been carried out that demonstrate both the overt and subtle dimensions of racism that exist in this country.

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Underpinning it are moral panics about so-called boat people, ‘Islamic’ extremism, creeping shariah, the burqa debate, a clash of civilisations, angry men as ticking time bombs.

I am just as interested in subtle racism as I am in the overt. While subtle racism is systemic and pervasive, it is easily disguised and denied and represents a symbolic violence, challenging people’s status as legitimate social participants. Its banality renders it less embarrassing to the dominant cultural elite and so it doesn’t really provoke much fuss.

Yet while I am utterly appalled by our government and community stance on asylum seekers, for example, and see that debate as a clear example of how effectively some politicians and media commentators can exploit the politics of fear and racism, I am also concerned by the white-washing of our popular cultural content on TV as another example.

Trivial? Perhaps, but nonetheless an example of the dangers of systemic and subtle racism. Our popular culture and media can disenfranchise and delegitimise human beings who are literally liquid papered white in our cultural, artistic and political production.

The ‘ethnics’ and Aboriginals are relegated to SBS while commercial TV is still predominantly white. Neighbours practically imploded when an Indian family arrived on Ramsay Street.

Our hospital and medical shows are also largely white even though anybody who’s been to the ER department of any Aussie hospital knows it’s the Aussies of Indian and Asian descent who run the show.

I see this as a cultural white elite desperate to retain the delusion of a monocultural society against the reality of our clearly diverse population. As for our indigenous population, they are by and large invisible.

After all, as anthropologist Ghassan Hage argues, Australia constituted itself physically through a racist act. It exists as a territory because of an act of appropriation of a land and the decimation of a people who were defined racially.

The ‘us and them’ project continues, perpetually against indigenous Australians, and cyclically against various kinds of ‘brown or third-world looking people.’

Australia’s culture of racism can only be challenged when we acknowledge and address the systemic, shameful racism that persists against our indigenous population, and cure the racism that deprives agency and dignity to the indigenous people of this country.

This is fundamentally about honestly rejecting our colonial mindset, understanding and owning up to dominant group Anglo privilege and reinventing ourselves as a nation.

Randa-Abdel-Fattah*Randa Abdel-Fattah is an author and current PhD candidate, exploring Islamophobia and racism in Australia. You can follow her on Twitter: @RandaAFattah.

Source

Nick o’doherty : “YOUR OPININONS COUNT(sic)”

The speech that stops the barbie

So slap a drop bear on the cook top, bite the top off a Darwin stubby and harden up harken to the words of Nick!

In all our recorded history such words have never been uttered!  If you don’t believe us ask a barristor (sic) !

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American Psycho??

We don’t usually deal with nutters from overseas unless they stray into our orbit.

However this charm school graduate from the US recently messaged one of our Australian female supporters. When our folk get messages like that we like to give the senders the right sort of attention.

michaelrehnert

Michael is around 19 years of age. He likes Defence Leagues, guns and anti-Muslim groups and has some very dodgy friends over this side of the ocean.

michaelrehnert3

Michael likes powerful military assault hardware as well. In view of recent events in the US he will no doubt be confining his passion to looking at pictures of them.

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So you don’t need to clear your desks to do so but you might like to contact Michael’s local FBI office and let them know the sort of disturbed people they have on their watch.

FBI Office Williamsport

Federal Building, Room 206
240 West 3rd Street
Williamsport, PA 17701
Phone: 1100 +1 + (570) 323-3791
Fax: 1100 +1+(570) 329-5359

From a mobile the phone number would be +15703233791

Or via US diplomatic posts here

Canberra
American Embassy: 02-6214-5600
Sydney Suboffice
American Consulate: 02-9373-9200